U-Visa

Short Hills U Visa Consultants

Compassionate Immigration Services

Victims of serious crimes may be eligible for the U visa, a powerful immigration benefit that allows recipients to live and work in the United States if they are willing to cooperate with law enforcement. U visa beneficiaries have the ability to apply for green cards after several years, meaning this visa can serve as a viable pathway to permanent U.S. citizenship. In certain circumstances, eligibility for a U visa can also put a stop to removal proceedings.

If you have been the victim of a serious crime, our Short Hills U visa law consultants at Worldwide Legal Services are prepared to fight for you. Our team has managed over 10,000 cases and has accumulated more than 50 years of combined professional experience. We can work to secure a U visa that allows you and your loved ones to remain and build a future in the United States.

Qualifying for the U Visa

The U visa can potentially be issued to any noncitizen that suffers “substantial physical or mental abuse” in connection with a serious crime. Up to 10,000 U visas can be issued each year.

Victims of the following types of crimes may qualify for the U visa:

  • Abduction
  • Blackmail
  • Being Held Hostage
  • Domestic Violence
  • Extortion
  • False Imprisonment
  • Incest
  • Involuntary Servitude
  • Kidnapping
  • Manslaughter
  • Murder
  • Obstruction of Justice
  • Perjury
  • Rape
  • Sexual Assault
  • Torture
  • Witness Tampering

The crime itself does not need to necessarily occur: Victims involved in the attempt, conspiracy, or solicitation of any of these crimes or other serious crimes can also qualify. The crime must violate some law of the United States and take place within its borders.

To be eligible for the U visa, victims must have useful information about the crime and be willing to cooperate with law enforcement in an ensuing investigation. This information must be determined to be “helpful” to local, state, or federal investigators or prosecutors. To that end, a U visa will only be issued if a law enforcement official, judge, prosecutor, or some other relevant government authority provides a certification that the victim cooperated and that their information was useful.

Obtaining a U Visa will often involve knowing who to proactively communicate with. If you have knowledge about a serious crime, our Short Hills U visa consultants can work to connect you to the relevant authorities and negotiate the issuing of the necessary certifications.

Benefits of the U Visa

With a U visa, you can live and work practically anywhere in the United States. U visas will typically last for up to 4 years but can be extended in extremely limited circumstances. During this time, you will need to remain in touch with the relevant authorities and continue to cooperate with any investigations or prosecutions as necessary.

Upon formally applying for the U visa, you will immediately be able to request a work permit while your case is adjudicated. If your U visa is approved, you will automatically receive a work permit. Spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21 can be included in a U visa application and may also be eligible to receive work authorizations if approved.

U visa eligibility can also potentially be leveraged as a removal defense. If you are in danger of being removed but may be eligible for the U visa, applying can halt the removal while your petition is adjudicated. If your application is approved, the U visa will facilitate your remaining in the United States while you cooperate with the investigation or prosecution.


Do not wait to call (908) 948-8909 or contact us online if you are the victim of a crime and are unsure how to proceed. We offer our services in English, Portuguese, and Spanish.


Obtaining a Green Card Through the U Visa

In certain circumstances, you may be able to procure a green card, which confers lawful permanent residency, through the U visa. There is no annual cap on the number of green cards issued to U visa beneficiaries, but you must meet strict requirements in order to be eligible.

To obtain a green card, a U visa beneficiary must:

  • Have maintained at least 3 years of continuous presence in the U.S. with their U visa
  • Have not refused to cooperate with law enforcement at any point
  • Demonstrate their remaining in the U.S. is in the public interest or promotes family unity or is connected to some humanitarian need

Your remaining in the U.S. may be “in the public interest” if your skills and accomplishments could conceivably benefit the country’s economy or meet the needs of a local community. You can argue “family unity” if you have other family members that will continue to live in the United States regardless of whether you remain. You may also argue that a return to your home country or a previous country of residence would warrant some form of “extreme hardship.”

Securing a green card through the U visa involves building a compelling case and requires careful timing. U visas only generally last for a maximum of 4 years, and beneficiaries can only request a green card after 3 years. Our Short Hills U visa consultants at Worldwide Legal Services can help you navigate this complex process and ensure your case is persuasive.


Our firm can help you build a strong case. Call (908) 948-8909 or contact us online today.


Transparency • Clarity • Trust

Our Clients Share Their Experience
  • “We received the permanent resident card in even less time than was first communicated.”

    - Michael K.
  • “I am very satisfied and will recommend the service to my friends.”

    - Monica G.
  • “Our matter was resolved in a very timely manner and the outcome was better than we expected.”

    - Rand U.
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